laboratoire de physique statistique
 
 
laboratoire de physique statistique

Publications

Rechercher
Martine BEN AMAR 


JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY INTERFACE 


3
P U B L I C A T I O N S

S E L E C T I O N N E R
P A R M I :



 
2015
Morpho-elasticity of inflammatory fibrosis: the case of capsular contracture - Ben Amar, Martine and Wu, Min and Trejo, Miguel and Atlan, Michael
JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY INTERFACE 12 (2015) 
LPS


Abstract : Inflammatory fibrosis is a wound-healing reaction of the immune system in mammals against aggression. After a signalling cascade, fibroblasts and potentially myofibroblasts make a stiff collagenous tissue inside the body that modifies the original healthy tissue. We focus here on the implant-induced fibrosis that aims to encapsulate the implant with a typical fibrous tissue called the capsule. Focusing on breast capsules, we aim to understand the mechanical properties of these tissues, to test the validity of fibre models that have been established in other contexts such as arteries. For this purpose, we perform force-extension experiments and show that mechanical constitutive laws of these tissues are especially difficult to derive, because models are sensitive to fibre orientation and dispersion, independently of the variation between individuals. In addition, fibre breakdown, and possibly remodelling, occur during the extension experiments. However, the high stiffness of the capsular tissue, compared with the healthy tissue, added to the fact that an inflammatory process has no reason to cease, is at the origin of large compressive stresses in vivo, which explains the pain and unaesthetic deformity. We evaluate the stresses responsible for the pain and the buckling instability, which have no reason to stop if the inflammation persists.
 
2014
Patterns in melanocytic lesions: impact of the geometry on growth and transport inside the epidermis - Balois, Thibaut and Chatelain, Clement and Ben Amar, Martine
JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY INTERFACE 11 (2014) 
LPS


Abstract : In glabrous skin, nevi and melanomas exhibit pigmented stripes during clinical dermoscopic examination. They find their origin in the basal layer geometry which periodically exhibits ridges, alternatively large (limiting ridges) and thin (intermediate ridges). However, nevus and melanoma lesions differ by the localization of the pigmented stripes along furrows or ridges of the epidermis surface. Here, we propose a biomechanical model of avascular tumour growth which takes into account this specific geometry in the epidermis where both kinds of lesions first appear. Simulations show a periodic distribution of tumour cells inside the lesion, with a global contour stretched out along the ridges. In order to be as close as possible to clinical observations, we also consider the melanin transport by the keratinocytes. Our simulations show that reasonable assumptions on melanocytic cell repartition in the ridges favour the limiting ridges of the basal compared with the intermediate ones in agreement with nevus observations but not really with melanomas. It raises the question of cell aggregation and repartition of melanocytic cells in acral melanomas and requires further biological studies of these cells in situ.
 
2011
The radial growth phase of malignant melanoma: multi-phase modelling, numerical simulations and linear stability analysis - Ciarletta, P. and Foret, L. and Ben Amar, M.
JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY INTERFACE 8345-368 (2011) 
LPS


Abstract : Cutaneous melanoma is disproportionately lethal despite its relatively low incidence and its potential for cure in the early stages. The aim of this study is to foster understanding of the role of microstructure on the occurrence of morphological changes in diseased skin during melanoma evolution. The authors propose a biomechanical analysis of its radial growth phase, investigating the role of intercellular/stromal connections on the initial stages of epidermis invasion. The radial growth phase of a primary melanoma is modelled within the multi-phase theory of mixtures, reproducing the mechanical behaviour of the skin layers and of the epidermal-dermal junction. The theoretical analysis takes into account those cellular processes that have been experimentally observed to disrupt homeostasis in normal epidermis. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the loss of adhesiveness of the melanoma cells both to the basal laminae, caused by deregulation mechanisms of adherent junctions, and to adjacent keratynocytes, consequent to a downregulation of E-cadherin, are the fundamental biomechanical features for promoting tumour initiation. Finally, the authors provide the mathematical proof of a long wavelength instability of the tumour front during the early stages of melanoma invasion. These results open the perspective to correlate the early morphology of a growing melanoma with the biomechanical characteristics of its micro-environment.