laboratoire de physique statistique
 
 
laboratoire de physique statistique

Publications

Rechercher
Martine BEN AMAR 


PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 


1
P U B L I C A T I O N S



 
2013
Anisotropic growth shapes intestinal tissues during embryogenesis - Ben Amar, Martine and Jia, Fei
PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 11010525-10530 (2013) 
LPS


Abstract : Embryogenesis offers a real laboratory for pattern formation, buckling, and postbuckling induced by growth of soft tissues. Each part of our body is structured in multiple adjacent layers: the skin, the brain, and the interior of organs. Each layer has a complex biological composition presenting different elasticity. Generated during fetal life, these layers will experience growth and remodeling in the early postfertilization stages. Here, we focus on a herringbone pattern occurring in fetal intestinal tissues. Common to many mammalians, this instability is a precursor of the villi, finger-like projections into the lumen. For avians (chicks' and turkeys' embryos), it has been shown that, a few days after fertilization, the mucosal epithelium of the duodenum is smooth, and then folds emerge, which present 2 d later a pronounced zigzag instability. Many debates and biological studies are devoted to this specific morphology, which regulates the cell renewal in the intestine. After reviewing experimental results about duodenum morphogenesis, we show that a model based on simplified hypothesis for the growth of the mesenchyme can explain buckling and postbuckling instabilities. Being completely analytical, it is based on biaxial compressive stresses due to differential growth between layers and it predicts quantitatively the morphological changes. The growth anisotropy increasing with time, the competition between folds and zigzags, is proved to occur as a secondary instability. The model is compared with available experimental data on chick's duodenum and can be applied to other intestinal tissues, the zigzag being a common and spectacular microstructural pattern of intestine embryogenesis.