laboratoire de physique statistique
 
 
laboratoire de physique statistique

Publications

Rechercher
David BENSIMON 


NUCLEIC ACIDS RESEARCH 


3
P U B L I C A T I O N S

S E L E C T I O N N E R
P A R M I :



 
2012
Mechanism of strand displacement synthesis by DNA replicative polymerases - Manosas, Maria and Spiering, Michelle M. and Ding, Fangyuan and Bensimon, David and Allemand, Jean-Francois and Benkovic, Stephen J. and Croquette, Vincent
NUCLEIC ACIDS RESEARCH 406174-6186 (2012) 
LPS


Abstract : Replicative holoenzymes exhibit rapid and processive primer extension DNA synthesis, but inefficient strand displacement DNA synthesis. We investigated the bacteriophage T4 and T7 holoenzymes primer extension activity and strand displacement activity on a DNA hairpin substrate manipulated by a magnetic trap. Holoenzyme primer extension activity is moderately hindered by the applied force. In contrast, the strand displacement activity is strongly stimulated by the applied force; DNA polymerization is favoured at high force, while a processive exonuclease activity is triggered at low force. We propose that the DNA fork upstream of the holoenzyme generates a regression pressure which inhibits the polymerization-driven forward motion of the holoenzyme. The inhibition is generated by the distortion of the template strand within the polymerization active site thereby shifting the equilibrium to a DNA-protein exonuclease conformation. We conclude that stalling of the holoenzyme induced by the fork regression pressure is the basis for the inefficient strand displacement synthesis characteristic of replicative polymerases. The resulting processive exonuclease activity may be relevant in replisome disassembly to reset a stalled replication fork to a symmetrical situation. Our findings offer interesting applications for single-molecule DNA sequencing.
 
2010
Active and passive mechanisms of helicases - Manosas, Maria and Xi, Xu Guang and Bensimon, David and Croquette, Vincent
NUCLEIC ACIDS RESEARCH 385518-5526 (2010) 
LPS


Abstract : In this work, we discuss the active or passive character of helicases. In the past years, several studies have used the theoretical framework proposed by Betterton and Julicher [Betterton, M.D. and Julicher, F. (2005) Opening of nucleic-acid double strands by helicases: active versus passive opening. Phys. Rev. E, 71, 11904-11911.] to analyse the unwinding data and assess the mechanism of the helicase under study (active versus passive). However, this procedure has given rise to apparently contradictory interpretations: helicases exhibiting similar behaviour have been classified as both active and passive enzymes [Johnson, D.S., Bai, L. Smith, B.Y., Patel, S.S. and Wang, M.D. (2007) Single-molecule studies reveal dynamics of DNA unwinding by the ring-shaped T7 helicase. Cell, 129, 1299-1309; Lionnet, T., Spiering, M.M., Benkovic, S.J., Bensimon, D. and Croquette, V. (2007) Real-time observation of bacteriophage T4 gp41 helicase reveals an unwinding mechanism Proc. Natl Acid. Sci., 104, 19790-19795]. In this work, we show that when the helicase under study has not been previously well characterized (namely, if its step size and rate of slippage are unknown) a multi-parameter fit to the afore-mentioned model can indeed lead to contradictory interpretations. We thus propose to differentiate between active and passive helicases on the basis of the comparison between their observed translocation velocity on single-stranded nucleic acid and their unwinding rate of double-stranded nucleic acid (with various GC content and under different tensions). A threshold separating active from passive behaviour is proposed following an analysis of the reported activities of different helicases. We study and contrast the mechanism of two helicases that exemplify these two behaviours: active for the RecQ helicase and passive for the gp41 helicase.
 
2008
The antiparallel loops in gal DNA - Lia, Giuseppe and Semsey, Szabolcs and Lewis, Dale E. A. and Adhya, Sankar and Bensimon, David and Dunlap, David and Finzi, Laura
NUCLEIC ACIDS RESEARCH 364204-4210 (2008) 
LPS


Abstract : Interactions between proteins bound to distant sites along a DNA molecule require bending and twisting deformations in the intervening DNA. In certain systems, the sterically allowed proteinDNA and proteinprotein interactions are hypothesized to produce loops with distinct geometries that may also be thermodynamically and biologically distinct. For example, theoretical models of Gal repressor/HU-mediated DNA-looping suggest that the antiparallel DNA loops, A1 and A2, are thermodynamically quite different. They are also biologically different, since in experiments using DNA molecules engineered to form only one of the two loops, the A2 loop failed to repress in vitro transcription. Surprisingly, single molecule measurements show that both loop trajectories form and that they appear to be quite similar energetically and kinetically.