laboratoire de physique statistique
 
 
laboratoire de physique statistique

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MOLECULAR CELL 


2
P U B L I C A T I O N S



 
2013
RecA-Promoted, RecFOR-Independent Progressive Disassembly of Replisomes Stalled by Helicase Inactivation (Retracted article. See vol. 54, pg. 537, 2014) - Lia, Giuseppe and Rigato, Annafrancesca and Long, Emilie and Chagneau, Carine and Le Masson, Marie and Allemand, Jean-Francois and Michel, Benedicte
MOLECULAR CELL 49547-557 (2013)

Abstract : In all organisms, replication impairment is a recognized source of genomic instability, raising an increasing interest in the fate of inactivated replication forks. We used Escherichia coli strains with a temperature-inactivated replicative helicase (DnaB) and in vivo single-molecule microscopy to quantify the detailed molecular processing of stalled replication forks. After helicase inactivation, RecA binds to blocked replication forks and is essential for the rapid release of hPol III. The entire holoenzyme is disrupted little by little, with some components lost in few minutes, while others are stable in 70\% of cells for at least 1 hr. Although replisome dissociation is delayed in a recA mutant, it is not affected by RecF or RecO inactivation. RecFOR are required for full RecA filaments formation, and we propose that polymerase clearance can be catalyzed by short, RecFOR-independent RecA filaments. Our results identify a function for the universally conserved, central recombination protein RecA.
The biophysics and cell biology of lipid droplets - Thiam, Abdou Rachid and Farese, Jr., Robert V. and Walther, Tobias C.
NATURE REVIEWS MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY 14775-786 (2013)

Abstract : Lipid droplets are intracellular organelles that are found in most cells, where they have fundamental roles in metabolism. They function prominently in storing oil-based reserves of metabolic energy and components of membrane lipids. Lipid droplets are the dispersed phase of an oil-in-water emulsion in the aqueous cytosol of cells, and the importance of basic biophysical principles of emulsions for lipid droplet biology is now being appreciated. Because of their unique architecture, with an interface between the dispersed oil phase and the aqueous cytosol, specific mechanisms underlie their formation, growth and shrinkage. Such mechanisms enable cells to use emulsified oil when the demands for metabolic energy or membrane synthesis change. The regulation of the composition of the phospholipid surfactants at the surface of lipid droplets is crucial for lipid droplet homeostasis and protein targeting to their surfaces.